Believing What We Want: Conspiracy Theories and the Gospel

Our hearts, bodies, and minds need to desire the right things, so that when we are confronted with information that plays on alternate desires and fears we are not persuaded.

The Revelation of Contagion in a Time of Pandemic

A lot of people have been watching Contagion recently, and many others are asking why. Is it strangely comforting? Terrifying but in a helpfully distancing way? Morbidly fascinating? The apocalyptic book of Revelation can help us understand.

Just Mercy Calls Us to Be the Family of God

Our apathy toward racial injustice is partially rooted in an insufficient understanding of the family of God.

Exhibit A Pulls the Rug Out from Under Our Notion of Truth 

In our enthusiasm to defend truth, we have denied a doctrine at the heart of our faith: that we are finite, sin-corrupted creatures with senses and intellect that are both inherently limited by our creatureliness and marred by the introduction of sin into the world.

Booksmart and Female Ambition

Yet the more radical vision of flourishing for women would strike harder at the heart of the film’s concept: what if Molly’s real mistake was in her ultimate goal of power and success?

Melodies of Sin and Salvation: Why Modern Worship Music Needs a More Holistic View of Salvation

Our worship should teach us to long for more than our individual salvation, but to long for the redemption of the whole world.

Advent Is Actually Quite Political

In these seasons of Advent and Christmas especially, history points to a church whose worship is particularly political.

Slow Burn Reveals Our Historical Blind Spots

More than anything, Slow Burn reminded me of one of evangelicals’ (and Americans’) greatest blind spots: our own history.

The Bible, Explained

When we continue feeding our desire for easy answers, we lose the ability to approach complexity with the appropriate tools.

Leave No Trace and the Struggle to Leave Behind the Fears of Our Parents

As Leave No Trace teaches us, we’ve all been given lenses tinted by unhealthy fears because we live in a broken world that inflicts varying degrees of trauma on everyone.

Ben Myers’s The Apostles’ Creed Reminds Us of Our Roots

When we recite an ancient creed, we aren’t just reminded of our roots but of our current connection to a global church.

Finding the Church in the Horror Masterpiece A Quiet Place

Instead of viewing each other as only possessing weaknesses to be overcome, in A Quiet Place the Abbott family reminds us that our weaknesses can make each other stronger, and the strength of community is only possible because of its vulnerability.

Paige Patterson Counsel Abounds When Women Aren’t Given a Seat at the Theological Table

If we are not listening, if we are not in community with people of color, women, the poor, the disabled, and the marginalized, we are guaranteed to make theological errors.

Annihilation Reveals the Dark Side of Vulnerability

Annihilation teaches us, among other things, that sometimes our confession is more cathartic than redemptive.

Why Do Christians Respond So Poorly to Tragedies Like the Parkland School Shooting?

Instead of dealing with tragedies like Parkland, Christians quickly spiritualize the issue in an effort to abstract the material reality away.

Subtweeting Our Righteousness before Men

We pull quotes out of context to justify or support any argument, often with little care to how the larger narrative (of Scripture or of Dr. King’s life and work) would help us interpret the one little snippet we want to use.