God Is Stranger by Krish Kandiah, Free for CAPC Members

When we recognize how God is both strange and good, familiar and unfamiliar, and how the Bible is strange and true, we need not fear the “unhighlighted” portions of our Bibles, but read them with confidence.

Seeing and Believing 157: Brad Bird’s The Incredibles 2 and Morgan Neville’s Won’t You Be My Neighbor?

The guys tackle two family-friendly flicks on this week’s episode, as they review Brad Bird’s fourteen-years-in-the-making sequel to Pixar’s superhero smash The Incredibles 2.A fond return to Mr. Rogers’ Neighborhood is on the itinerary as well as Wade and Kevin discuss Won’t You Be My Neighbor?

RBG Is an Invitation to Love Our Political Neighbors

In RBG, West and Cohen offer a welcome salve for our society’s wounds, a celebration of Ginsburg as Ginsburg, irreducible to any political stance.

Christ and Pop Culture Summer 2018 Reading Guide

Here are some books we love and think you might, too.

Celebrate Juneteenth Like July Fourth, but Better

Juneteenth represents the day the whole of America was set on a trajectory of freedom and justice for all.

Persuasion 139: Why Twitter Cares about IHOP’s IHOb Campaign

In this ounce of Persuasion fast chat, Erin Straza and Hannah Anderson assess the IHOP / IHOB’s failed online communication to a previous conversation discuss the need for better online engagement.

Seeing and Believing 156: Paul Schrader’s First Reformed and Ari Aster’s Hereditary

Spiritual warfare can take many forms, as shown by the two films on this week’s episode. First up is Wade and Kevin’s most anticipated film of the summer, First Reformed, followed by A24’s latest foray into horror: Ari Aster’s Hereditary.

When Your ‘Story’ Gets in the Way of Your Testimony: Lessons from Leslie Jamison’s The Recovering

Jamison’s book recommends the freedom that comes with simply admitting that we need help… like everybody else.

Hereditary Is a Masterful Meditation on the Horrors of Grief

In Hereditary, guilt is grief’s demonic cousin, and it often makes an unwelcome entrance in the midst of tragedy.

Anthony Bourdain Taught Us about Breaking Bread in a Broken World

By turning the cameras onto his guests, Bourdain revealed to his audience a world at once vastly diverse, painfully complex, and beautifully human.

Nancy Drew and the Case of the Fat-Shaming Trope

The Nancy Drew books of the 80s and 90s are aggressively anti-fat, likely contributing to young girls’ earliest encounters with weight loss, dieting, and negative self-image.

Where the Wild Things Are: Max, the Prodigal Son, and Us

But in Where the Wild Things Are, Sendak does not simply recast the Prodigal Son as a children’s fable. The book is art.

Seeing and Believing 155: Netflix’s Wild Wild Country and Brett Haley’s Hearts Beat Loud

Netflix’s new documentary miniseries Wild Wild Country tries to get to the bottom of a 1980s dispute between a religious commune and the Oregon community next door. Also the Nick Offerman-starring Hearts Beat Loud, a feel-good indie movie about a dad trying to get the band back together with his college-bound daughter.

What the NFL (and the Church) Can Learn from the NBA

Like many with power, the NFL owners are using their wealth and status to steamroll those in a weaker position.

Solo: Gambling on an Origin Story

Solo: A Star Wars Story edifies not only the existing Star Wars canon, but it injects new meaning into the life and storyline of Han Solo.

Blessed Are the Unsatisfied by Amy Simpson, Free for CAPC Members

Living unsatisfied is the reality we know deep down and no longer need to cover with a shiny veneer.