CBS All Access’s Spiritless Twilight Zone

Rod Serling’s Twilight Zone could contend for human worth on the basis of a shared imago Dei, a spiritual aspect that provides an inherent value to each individual, while the reboot seems content to regard men and women materialistically.

Dark and Longing for the End of the World

The characters of Dark are stuck in a world that has no end: what they want is an eschaton, where death is undone, and the world can be made new.

“Wayward Ted”: Celebrating the Fruit of the Spirit in Ted Lasso

In a time when winning has become the ultimate morality, and the struggle to gain and maintain power has turned otherwise absolute standards of goodness into subjective opinion in the eyes of so many, we all need more of what Ted Lasso is dishing out. 

Netflix’s (Un)Well and Our Misplaced Search to End Suffering

God wants us to care for the bodies that He has given us, but He also wants us to care for our friends and our families, and to live in community with others. Often, wellness trends have the propensity to drive us away from such community.

Cuties Isn’t the Problem: Our Cultural Addiction to the Sexualization of Minors 

Cuties is the product of perverse people who are perverse consumers who drive a capitalistic structure to give us what we want.

COVID-19 Is Our Monster and Our Mirror

COVID-19 has become our society’s most recent real-life monster.

“Time Adventure”: Solace in Non-Linearity

God’s view of time operates entirely differently from the human view, as His omniscience of all history and future outcomes prevents Him from being negatively affected by any present moment.

What Do We Owe Each Other While We Wait for The Good Place?

In essence, “What are my rights?” is private and individual. “What do we owe one another?” is personal and communal. It’s to shift from “What do I deserve?” to “What is best for us?”

Gardeners’ World and the Object of Attention

A good world that begs—and begets—attention is on display in Gardeners’ World.

Out of Many, One: What Jane the Virgin Can Teach Us about Immigration

We’ve forgotten (or refuse to see) that we are better because of our diversity, because we are a nation of immigrants, and because our collective experiences make us stronger.

Smallville’s Storied Heroism

Or perhaps it would be better stated that Smallville explores how Clark Kent’s heroism isn’t in how he uses his powers, but in how he has to learn to lay his powers aside—over and over again.

Dream Smaller: The Faithful Obedience of Father Beocca

Too often “dream bigger” has been the mantra of Evangelicals, as if when Jesus spoke the Great Commission, what he really meant was, “Go big, or go home.”

Everything Is Not Okay: How Chernobyl Tells Our Story

Chernobyl has acted as a reminder to me that social media hasn’t made people crazy, paranoid, or stupid—people have always been willing to spread misinformation, lies, and conspiracies when it suits an agenda like a political or religious ideology.

Star Trek: Discovery’s Christopher Pike: An Old-Fashioned Hero for Our Cynical Times

In Star Trek: Discovery, Captain Pike shows an unswerving commitment to goodness and willing sacrifice that isn’t just refreshing, it’s downright inspirational.

Hamilton Invites Us to Imagine the Power of Forgiveness

Alexander is redeemed, not because he deserves it, but because Eliza grants redemption to him.

Why Tickle Me Elmo Is the Key to Understanding Our Current Political Chaos (Sort Of)

It was obviously a touch ironic that Sesame Street, as a show created for poor inner-city kids, was inspiring such rabid suburban consumerism, but at the time, it was actually exactly what Sesame Street needed.