Seeing and Believing 156: Paul Schrader’s First Reformed and Ari Aster’s Hereditary

Spiritual warfare can take many forms, as shown by the two films on this week’s episode. First up is Wade and Kevin’s most anticipated film of the summer, First Reformed, followed by A24’s latest foray into horror: Ari Aster’s Hereditary.

Anthony Bourdain Taught Us about Breaking Bread in a Broken World

By turning the cameras onto his guests, Bourdain revealed to his audience a world at once vastly diverse, painfully complex, and beautifully human.

Seeing and Believing 155: Netflix’s Wild Wild Country and Brett Haley’s Hearts Beat Loud

Netflix’s new documentary miniseries Wild Wild Country tries to get to the bottom of a 1980s dispute between a religious commune and the Oregon community next door. Also the Nick Offerman-starring Hearts Beat Loud, a feel-good indie movie about a dad trying to get the band back together with his college-bound daughter.

Let Us (All) Eat Cake

The church has far too often failed to critique the way our culture shames the bodies of those outside the ideal and given theological weight to claims that some bodies are more godly than others.

Agents, Aliens, and Angels: Salvation in The X-Files

I am hopeful that The X-Files will be remembered as an allegory of faith and faithfulness, rather than the twisted Greek tragedy it seemingly became at its close.

Seeing and Believing 154: Bart Layton’s American Animals and Ben Howling and Yolanda Ramke’s Cargo

The guys take it down a notch after the blockbusters of last week. First they review American Animals, director Bart Layton’s follow-up to The Impostor.

Arrested Development‘s #MeToo Moment

Not only did these men fail to do the right thing in the moment; they failed to recognize the part they played in perpetuating their female colleague’s pain.

Planet Earth II, Imago Dei, and a Redeemed Creation

Human life is so much more meaningful than a mad scramble for existence—the sum total of our days so much more than to live and breed, to fight for existence and then die.

Roseanne Is Back, and She’s Not Sorry

In Roseanne, the Conners’ current state of fragmentation, political and social, is like holding a mirror up to our society. It ain’t pretty, but it’s us.

Better Call Saul and the Ache for Approval

In Better Call Saul, James and Charles McGill mirror the relationship of the two brothers from the Parable of the Prodigal Son.

Brooklyn Nine-Nine and the Unrelenting Optimism of Jake Peralta

Better to live life as a heroic optimist, desiring and expecting good, flourishing, and well-being in and for others.

Smartphones, Guns, and Black Mirror: The Shaping of Our Technology

Like Daly in the Black Mirror episode “USS Callister,” guns and technology allow us to imagine a world in which we call the shots.

Jesus Christ Superstar Live! Dazzling, Remarkable, and Hopeless

Fortunately, Jesus Christ Superstar Live! was only a play—a surprisingly good play—and not reality.

Is Mrs. Maisel So Marvelous?

Though we gravitate toward Midge’s beautiful and witty story of overcoming, it is modeled upon an American myth that to be free we must ultimately be unencumbered and successful.

Jessica Jones: Consent, Autonomy, and Being Remade in Man’s Image

Jessica Jones is a distinctly feminine hero story in a male world delivered to us in the era of #metoo.

Duty, Desire, and The Crown Season Two

The Crown shows us that we cannot live on duty alone.