Ben Myers’s The Apostles’ Creed Reminds Us of Our Roots

When we recite an ancient creed, we aren’t just reminded of our roots but of our current connection to a global church.

Persuasion 141: Get Appointed to Your Dream Job (No Experience Necessary)

In this ounce of Persuasion fast chat, Erin Straza and Hannah Anderson discuss dream jobs that, like being appointed to the Supreme Court, have zero requirements. For Hannah, it’s being a justice; for Erin, it’s being a food critic.

Persuasion 140: The Blame Game in Separating Families

Erin and Hannah discuss the way our public discourse has become about winning and sides rather than solving a crisis that is looking for a blame game in separating families. Is it possible for us to set politics aside?

RBG Is an Invitation to Love Our Political Neighbors

In RBG, West and Cohen offer a welcome salve for our society’s wounds, a celebration of Ginsburg as Ginsburg, irreducible to any political stance.

Radical Love, Reconciliation, and the Royal Wedding

The Duke and Duchess of Sussex are a testimony to the power of love to redeem all things, even the most difficult and painful of histories.

Rearing Boys to Be Peacemakers in a World Bent on War

When we talk about toxic masculinity, this is what we mean: the mindset calling men to the worldly honor of physical dominance, at the expense of humility and grace.

Grief Without Escape Clauses: How a Cartoon Is Helping Us Mourn the Parkland Shooting

If the heavenly reading of Guerra’s illustration is meant to supplant the intense pain it addresses, then it’s being misread.

The Church Must Offer the World More Than Mere Authenticity

The Church has a profound gift for a world hungry for true authenticity: consistent convictions about truth.

What White Christians Can Learn from Eminem’s Diss to the President

My white Christian brothers and sisters can learn how to fight injustice from Eminem’s performance.

Evangelicals at the Immigration Crossroads: Justice for DREAMers

Justice and mercy demand an answer for DREAMers, even as we as a nation expend great effort to secure the border and uphold the rule of law.

Politics as Entertainment, Then and Now

There’s a long history that’s given us the expectation that our politics should entertain us.

Tearing Down the Statue of Liberty

Politically, I came of age in the mid-90s, and I have never forgotten the horror of Rwanda.

Beyond Otherness Is Where Friendship Begins

In contemporary U.S. society—as in Twain’s post-Civil War South, as in Le Guin’s 1960s culture war America—our shared humanity is dangerously easy to ignore.

That Time the Church Had One Pope, and Then Two Popes, and Then Three Popes

With multiple popes in play, the people could freely listen to whichever pope was convenient for them at the time, sort of like national church-shopping.

Robert P. George, Cornel West and the Gift of Civil Disagreement

If our nation’s leading intellectuals can disagree with each other and still be civil, why can’t the rest of us do the same?

Jesus the Populist, Cosmopolitan Christ

Jesus is more cosmopolitan than many ordinary Americans seem to recognize.