Seeing and Believing 157: Brad Bird’s The Incredibles 2 and Morgan Neville’s Won’t You Be My Neighbor?

The guys tackle two family-friendly flicks on this week’s episode, as they review Brad Bird’s fourteen-years-in-the-making sequel to Pixar’s superhero smash The Incredibles 2.A fond return to Mr. Rogers’ Neighborhood is on the itinerary as well as Wade and Kevin discuss Won’t You Be My Neighbor?

RBG Is an Invitation to Love Our Political Neighbors

In RBG, West and Cohen offer a welcome salve for our society’s wounds, a celebration of Ginsburg as Ginsburg, irreducible to any political stance.

Seeing and Believing 156: Paul Schrader’s First Reformed and Ari Aster’s Hereditary

Spiritual warfare can take many forms, as shown by the two films on this week’s episode. First up is Wade and Kevin’s most anticipated film of the summer, First Reformed, followed by A24’s latest foray into horror: Ari Aster’s Hereditary.

Hereditary Is a Masterful Meditation on the Horrors of Grief

In Hereditary, guilt is grief’s demonic cousin, and it often makes an unwelcome entrance in the midst of tragedy.

Seeing and Believing 155: Netflix’s Wild Wild Country and Brett Haley’s Hearts Beat Loud

Netflix’s new documentary miniseries Wild Wild Country tries to get to the bottom of a 1980s dispute between a religious commune and the Oregon community next door. Also the Nick Offerman-starring Hearts Beat Loud, a feel-good indie movie about a dad trying to get the band back together with his college-bound daughter.

Solo: Gambling on an Origin Story

Solo: A Star Wars Story edifies not only the existing Star Wars canon, but it injects new meaning into the life and storyline of Han Solo.

Seeing and Believing 154: Bart Layton’s American Animals and Ben Howling and Yolanda Ramke’s Cargo

The guys take it down a notch after the blockbusters of last week. First they review American Animals, director Bart Layton’s follow-up to The Impostor.

Seeing and Believing 153: Ron Howard’s Solo: A Star Wars Story and David Leitch’s Deadpool 2

Scoundrels everywhere can rejoice as Wade and Kevin tackle Solo: A Star Wars Story, the new Han Solo prequel from Disney, and amoral scoundrels everywhere can rejoice (possibly) over their review of the sequel to 2016’s R-rated breakout smash about the Merc with a Mouth, Deadpool 2.

Finding the Church in the Horror Masterpiece A Quiet Place

Instead of viewing each other as only possessing weaknesses to be overcome, in A Quiet Place the Abbott family reminds us that our weaknesses can make each other stronger, and the strength of community is only possible because of its vulnerability.

I Feel Pretty, The Greatest Showman, and the God Who Sees

The incomplete message of I Feel Pretty and The Greatest Showman is that I can change my world by merely changing my self-perception.

Your Favorite Marvel Superhero Has an Off-Screen Life

Comic books have the ability to be informative portholes for everything ranging from pop culture, science, and history, to governmental, economic, and social structures.

Avengers: Infinity War: When Death Isn’t Final

Movies with such a dismal ending don’t usually inspire audiences to keep coming back for more—let alone smash box office records—so what’s really going on with Infinity War?

There’s Something Rotten in Wes Anderson’s Isle of Dogs

As illustrated with ‘Isle of Dogs,’ when we ignore guidance from the past, we end up in a flawed world of our own creation, even if it appears immaculate on the surface.

Goodbye Christopher Robin Beckons Us Back to the Hundred Acre Wood

The stories of Winnie the Pooh and his friends were a reminder of good in this world—a childlike innocence that could still exist.

A Tale of Two Tomb Raiders: Sex and Objectification in the Action Franchise

Like in this year’s Tomb Raider, we deserve portrayals of female heroes who stand on equal ground with the best male action heroes—not tethered to objectifications of our sexual prowess.

In the Shade of Wakanda: The Resurrection of Broken White Boys

If we are ever to see difference as a gift, then we need a resurrection of sorts, but we would do well to remember that resurrection requires a death.