Cuties Isn’t the Problem: Our Cultural Addiction to the Sexualization of Minors 

Cuties is the product of perverse people who are perverse consumers who drive a capitalistic structure to give us what we want.

The Performers We’ve Lost and the Stories They Carried

The deaths of young celebrities lead to collective shock and grief because of the unique roles performers hold in society.

Alvin Kelly and the Flagpole Sitters of the 1920s: They Weren’t Sick, but They Weren’t Well…

It was the 1920s, and it felt like humanity could do anything—and it took the opportunity to do really stupid stuff, like pass off urinals as art, chase after nascent fascism, and—yes—sit around on flagpoles for days at a time.

Smallville’s Storied Heroism

Or perhaps it would be better stated that Smallville explores how Clark Kent’s heroism isn’t in how he uses his powers, but in how he has to learn to lay his powers aside—over and over again.

Videogames Probably Don’t Cause Violence, but They Sure Seemed like a Good Scapegoat in 1993

Joking aside, though, I’m sure you’re wondering—do violent videogames cause violence? The answer, according to science, is “Well, mayb…no. Prolly not.”

Everything Is Not Okay: How Chernobyl Tells Our Story

Chernobyl has acted as a reminder to me that social media hasn’t made people crazy, paranoid, or stupid—people have always been willing to spread misinformation, lies, and conspiracies when it suits an agenda like a political or religious ideology.

The Sisters Who Pulled a Prank and Accidentally Started a Religion

For Kate (age ten) and Maggie (age fourteen), the whole thing started as a harmless prank, but evolved into a movement of millions trying to talk to the dead.

How to Train Your Dragon: Revision, Restoration, and Edenic Longing

Even though How to Train Your Dragon should be a very silly story, sometimes very silly stories manage to say the very best things.

For a Few Years, Everyone in France Was Wearing Squid Hats, and the Guy Who Wrote Les Misérables Was to Blame

So-called cephalomania first took off in France, where it suddenly became fashionable to host octopus- and squid-themed parties, and for a few years, squid-shaped hats were considered to be the height of fashion among French women.

Children of Blood and Bone and the Importance of the Black Imagination in the West

Tomi Adeyemi’s success with Children of Blood and Bone is especially important for our cultural moment.

How Lava Lamps Made Sex Boring Again

Walker described the lamp as “Freudian” and evocative of the primordial ooze, because apparently no one bothered to take him aside and say, “It’s just a lamp, Ed.”

McCarthyism Was Driven by a Lot of Bluster, Paranoia, and Hearsay, Which for Legal Purposes Is a Fact Unrelated to the Present Political Moment

These hearings, like everything McCarthy had done up to this point, were fueled mainly by McCarthy’s desire to further his own career.

The Ickabog: A Fairy Tale and a Parable to Sear Our Consciences

I feel a searing of my own conscience as I read The Ickabog, especially in the context of events unfolding across America with the murder of George Floyd and the subsequent protests.

Why Tickle Me Elmo Is the Key to Understanding Our Current Political Chaos (Sort Of)

It was obviously a touch ironic that Sesame Street, as a show created for poor inner-city kids, was inspiring such rabid suburban consumerism, but at the time, it was actually exactly what Sesame Street needed.

Don’t Wait to Engage with Black Stories

We must also educate ourselves, immersing ourselves in the stories and experiences of the Black communities and individuals in America.

No, There Isn’t a Global Satanic Cult That Ritually Abuses Millions of Children, but for a Long Time We All Really Wanted to Believe There Was

It’s not really a mystery why people yearn to believe bizarre and dramatic tales of evil: the actual truth about evil is that it’s mundane, pervasive, and unfixable, at least to us mortals.