Southern Heritage or Hate? An Interview with the Hosts of Red Flag

“There’s a visceral reaction to our flag—as there should be—because of its history. And here in Mississippi, we don’t know our history.”

In The Ballad of Buster Scruggs, the Coen Brothers Show Love for the Good Book

By playing to the canon in The Ballad of Buster Scruggs, while at once forging their own trail, the Coens manage to both nod to and question the orthodoxy of what we’ve been told about the grand ‘ole world of outlaws and guns and rickety wagons.

Want People to Understand Your Political and Religious Beliefs? Support and Share Good Art

More often than not, information alone doesn’t change one’s mind. Stories do.

The Comic World as We Know It, Thanks to Stan Lee (1922–2018)

Perhaps his greatest legacy will be that he never treated comics and superheroes as mere disposable entertainment.

Slow Burn Reveals Our Historical Blind Spots

More than anything, Slow Burn reminded me of one of evangelicals’ (and Americans’) greatest blind spots: our own history.

Finding the Joke in Beautiful, Horrible People

We’re all beautiful, horrible people, and with both of these realities in mind we can ask, “What’s the joke?”

Transcendent Narrative in the Age of Hacking

Is free will just an artifice of Christian theology, not a scientific reality?

Brett Kavanaugh, Willful Ignorance, and the Pop Culture of the 1980s

Movies like 9 to 5 belie Justice Kavanaugh’s notion that men of the ’80s had no choice but to conform to the patterns of the era’s most boorish comedies.

The Vocation of Parenthood

I did not choose to become a parent so much as I was made a parent by forces larger and greater than I could ever fathom or control.

When Cops Make Mistakes: Thinking through Angie Thomas’s The Hate U Give

Angie Thomas’s The Hate U Give reminds us to do justice, to love mercy, and to walk humbly with our God.

Gen Z’s Biggest Legacy: Has Social Media Hacked a Generation?

Gen Z stumbled into social media blindly, but now we’re tasked with the responsibility of making sure that everything what happened to us doesn’t happen to our own kids.

Disney Sells Us an Idealized Derivative of Reality (and That’s Not All Bad)

The real Disney World—the physical space we enter—is an idealized derivative of imagined pasts, futures, and fantasies of the actual world.

Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood and the Fragility of Hope

Did Mister Rogers die with his hope intact? Is hope itself fragile? Can it withstand life in America today?

For the Love of the Con: Finding Community among the Geeks

Wanting to connect was my reason to attend comic con that first time, but it cannot explain why I want to go back as much as I do.

We Can’t All Be Hawkeye: On Choosing Childlessness

Why do so many outsiders feel the need to correct the childlessness they encounter?

The Ending Is the Drama: Mission: Impossible, Fairy Stories, and the Longing for Consolation

The Mission: Impossible films appeal to us because they offer a kind of terrifying drama that ends in assurance and consolation.