For a Few Years, Everyone in France Was Wearing Squid Hats, and the Guy Who Wrote Les Misérables Was to Blame

So-called cephalomania first took off in France, where it suddenly became fashionable to host octopus- and squid-themed parties, and for a few years, squid-shaped hats were considered to be the height of fashion among French women.

From Boccaccio to Chaucer: Storytelling during and after Plague Time

Why do something so frivolous as telling stories when human lives may be at stake? Shouldn’t we be in the business of… well, surviving?

Children of Blood and Bone and the Importance of the Black Imagination in the West

Tomi Adeyemi’s success with Children of Blood and Bone is especially important for our cultural moment.

Exploring America’s Love of a Steely Savior in Jesus and John Wayne

Jesus and John Wayne is history as confession, history as lament, a type of history that hopes in a God who never puts us to shame, even as hope in America does.

“I Am Not the One Who Can Forgive”: The Quarry and the Hopefulness of Violent Grace

The Quarry suggests that the awareness of our own sinfulness violently awakens us to our need for a new life.

The Ickabog: A Fairy Tale and a Parable to Sear Our Consciences

I feel a searing of my own conscience as I read The Ickabog, especially in the context of events unfolding across America with the murder of George Floyd and the subsequent protests.

Don’t Wait to Engage with Black Stories

We must also educate ourselves, immersing ourselves in the stories and experiences of the Black communities and individuals in America.

The Power and Necessity of African American Literature

If we are willing, our bookshelves and our readings lists can have an incarnational bent.

Understanding & Lamenting Racial Injustice: CAPC Staff Recommendations

Pop culture is a powerful force for change, and these picks from Christ and Pop Culture staff members are a great place to start.

Hippocampus Press, Small Publishers, and the Full Library

Religious readers may find important insights in the dark corners explored by Hippocampus Press and other niche publishers of weird fiction.

Symbols of Hope in A Tree Grows in Brooklyn

A Tree Grows in Brooklyn teaches readers how to argue for hope’s existence.

The Seamless Life by Steven Garber, Free for CAPC Members

If you’re wrestling with your vocation right now, the pithy and poignant thoughts Garber shares in The Seamless Life might be just the guide you need.

A Tale of Two Burgesses: On Reading Well in The Twilight Zone

The Twilight Zone points us toward reading not just as a recreational pastime but as a possible site for the cultivation of virtue.

Dog Man, Poop Jokes, and the Power of an Honest Story

Pilkey’s Dog Man books are able to communicate important truths without sacrificing the quality of the story—and he did that by being honest.

Sacred Endurance by Trillia Newbell, Free for CAPC Members

Newbell has the practical life experience and theological foundation to unpack what it means to run a race with endurance, and why the Bible so frequently utilizes this metaphor. 

#middlegrademarch, Reading Challenges, and Our Superabundance of Choice

A reading challenge can be just the pause we need to stop and consider which books in our collections contain truth and goodness—which are told in a beautiful way.