Finding Redemption in The O.C.

We’re 11 years removed from saying goodbye to the Cohens and The O.C., yet pop culture writers and fans alike regularly indulge in heated discussions about this hyper-self-aware soap opera’s merits and cultural impact.

Sneaky Pete: Incarnation Incognito

The lesson for us as Christians is that we likewise toe the precarious line of having our identities shaped by both a heavenly and earthly community.

Seeing and Believing 164: Carlos Lopez Estrada’s Blindspotting and Aaron Moorhead and Justin Benson’s The Endless

Wade and Kevin have gentrification on the mind this week, as they review two films about unwelcome new arrivals in the neighborhood: Carlos Lopez Estrada’s Blindspotting, a drama about race and indie sci-fi/thriller The Endless, the new neighbor is an otherworldly force revered by a backwoods cult.

Hannah Gadsby’s Nanette Proves That Laughter Is Not Always the Best Medicine

Part of Hannah Gadsby’s subversive power consists in the fact she still manages to be hilarious even as she refuses to let us rest in the abridgments necessary to her former punchlines.

Ugly Delicious Reveals the Beauty and Challenge of Neighborly Love

To critique a show, or an institution, or a dear friend can be an act of love.

Growing into Motherhood by Watching The West Wing

Motherhood is demanding, but does it require us to devote every ounce of our being to this new role?

Seeing and Believing 161: Debra Granik’s Leave No Trace and Boots Riley’s Sorry to Bother You

Wade and Kevin get lost in the woods for their first film this week: Leave No Trace, Debra Granik’s long-awaited follow-up to Winter’s Bone. Then things take a turn for the weird as the guys jump into Boots Riley satire of capitalism and racism run amok, Sorry to Bother You.

It’s a Beautiful Day in the Twitter-hood

Social media often ends up being a way for us to broadcast ourselves (or some moderated version of ourselves). But if everyone is talking, then who is listening?

How Mr. Rogers’s Analog Show Speaks to Us in a Digital Age

When we were just children, Mister Rogers gave us the tools we would need to combat the loneliness and isolation we would face as adults in the digital era.

Seeing and Believing 159: Stefano Sollima’s Sicario: Day of the Soldado and Our Cinematic Gateway Drugs

The release of Sicario: Day of the Soldado, the sequel to Denis Villeneuve’s acclaimed 2015 thriller about the U.S.-Mexico drug war, has the guys thinking about the gateway drugs that got them into movies in the first place.

Seeing and Believing 158: J.A. Bayona’s Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom and Gary Ross’s Ocean’s 8

Wade and Kevin decide to investigate whether Jurassic Word: Fallen Kingdom is a worthy successor to its ancestors. Then they decide to spend some time with some smooth criminals in the star-studded Ocean’s 8, in which Sandra Bullock leads a squad of thieves in – what else? – a daring heist.

Seeing and Believing 157: Brad Bird’s The Incredibles 2 and Morgan Neville’s Won’t You Be My Neighbor?

The guys tackle two family-friendly flicks on this week’s episode, as they review Brad Bird’s fourteen-years-in-the-making sequel to Pixar’s superhero smash The Incredibles 2.A fond return to Mr. Rogers’ Neighborhood is on the itinerary as well as Wade and Kevin discuss Won’t You Be My Neighbor?

Seeing and Believing 156: Paul Schrader’s First Reformed and Ari Aster’s Hereditary

Spiritual warfare can take many forms, as shown by the two films on this week’s episode. First up is Wade and Kevin’s most anticipated film of the summer, First Reformed, followed by A24’s latest foray into horror: Ari Aster’s Hereditary.

Anthony Bourdain Taught Us about Breaking Bread in a Broken World

By turning the cameras onto his guests, Bourdain revealed to his audience a world at once vastly diverse, painfully complex, and beautifully human.

Seeing and Believing 155: Netflix’s Wild Wild Country and Brett Haley’s Hearts Beat Loud

Netflix’s new documentary miniseries Wild Wild Country tries to get to the bottom of a 1980s dispute between a religious commune and the Oregon community next door. Also the Nick Offerman-starring Hearts Beat Loud, a feel-good indie movie about a dad trying to get the band back together with his college-bound daughter.

Let Us (All) Eat Cake

The church has far too often failed to critique the way our culture shames the bodies of those outside the ideal and given theological weight to claims that some bodies are more godly than others.